History

History Curriculum Intent
 
We believe the children at Hexham First School should have access to a History Curriculum which will enable them to have an appreciation and understanding of the past, understand how it shapes the present and inspire them to shape the future. We hope children will be proud of our local History and understand what makes it special. We want our children to make connections to the past from their families and grown-ups they know, understanding that History can be shared from living memory. 
 
Implementation
 
We follow the National Curriculum to guide our subject content. We use and revisit the following historical strands throughout each year group to deliver our History Curriculum. 
 
Historical Strands Covered at Hexham Fist School
> Chronological Understanding 
> Range and Depth of Historical Knowledge
> Historical Understanding
> Historical Interpretation
> Historical Enquiry and Investigation
> Presenting, Organising and Communicating
 
Early Years
In Early Years, developing a string sense of self and understanding similarities and differences between us, our families and different communities is the very basis for historical understanding. Children are nurtured to appreciate their specialness and the specialness of others and then encouraged to learn how to communicate this. Staff will follow children's individual interests and experiences to guide children's understanding of changes that occur over time alongside carefully chosen literature which will stimulate conversations. 
 
Kay Stage One
Progressing into Key Stage One, we have adopted an enquiry-based pedagogy. A special question is posed at the beginning of a unit of work and children research, collet information, think and discuss in order to answer the question. Children use their independent thinking and learning to answer the question at the end of the unit of work. A range of assessment opportunities are used such as: discussion, debate, poster creation, persuasive writing, creating booklets, drama and news report making. 
 
In Key Stage One, pupils should develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time.  They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented. 
 
During their time in Key Stage One, the units of work covered visit and revisit the different historical strands in order to embed and develop these skills. In Year One and Two, children investigate the historical strands by answering the following enquiry questions:
 
Year One - 
 
Year Two - 
 
 
Kay Stage Two
Moving into Key Stage Two, our enquiry approach continues, once again a special question is posed at the beginning of a unit of work and children research, collet information, think and discuss in order to answer the question. Children use their independent thinking and learning to answer the question at the end of the unit of work. A range of assessment opportunities are used such as: discussion, debate, poster creation, persuasive writing, creating booklets, drama and news report making.  
 
In Key Stage Two, pupils should continue to develop a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study. They should note connections, contrasts and trends over time and develop the appropriate use of historical terms. They should regularly address and sometimes devise historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference and significance. They should construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information. They should understand how our knowledge of the past is constructed from a range of sources. In planning to ensure the progression described above through teaching the British, local and world history outlined below, teacher should combine overview and depth studies to help pupils understand both the long arc of development and the complexity of specific aspects of the content. 
 
Pupils are require by the national curriculum to be taught:
> Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age
> The Roman Empire and it's impacts on Britain
> Britain's settlement by Anglo-Saxons and the Scots
> A local History study
 
During their time in Key Stage Two, the units of work covered visit and revisit the different historical strands in order to embed and develop these skills. In Year One and Two, children investigate the historical strands by answering the following enquiry questions:
 
Year Three - 
 
Year Four - 
 
Impact
It is our wish that during their time at Hexham First that pupils gain their own skilled understanding of the past and be able to describe their independent learning. Building on solid foundations from Early Years and using enquiry-based learning throughout Key Stages One and Tw, children will become proficient at explaining what they have found out and use their learning to form their unique responses and opinions. 
 
A range of monitoring measures are in place to reflect upon and judge the impact of our History Curriculum. Teachers reflects upon the responses to enquiry questions to see if children are working towards, at the expected level or greater depth in History for their age. Dedicated whole school monitoring meetings provide consistent monitoring opportunities across key stages and throughout the school. Pupil voice sessions allow children to have an active role in the planning and ,monitoring cycle. We are lucky to have a strong and supportive Governing Body who are included in the subject leadership cycle.